And So He Spoke

586 notes

writersrelief:

Tumblr For Writers: A Picture-Perfect Marketing And Promotional Tool
Tumblr, meet Writer. Writer, meet Tumblr. While you might think that a short-form blog like Tumblr would be counterintuitive for writers, this photo-centric platform is quickly becoming a viable marketing tool for promoting your writing. If you’re ready to shake up your social media presence by creating a Tumblr account, we have all the facts you need to know.

writersrelief:

Tumblr For Writers: A Picture-Perfect Marketing And Promotional Tool

Tumblr, meet Writer. Writer, meet Tumblr. While you might think that a short-form blog like Tumblr would be counterintuitive for writers, this photo-centric platform is quickly becoming a viable marketing tool for promoting your writing. If you’re ready to shake up your social media presence by creating a Tumblr account, we have all the facts you need to know.

(via writeworld)

Filed under tumblr writers self promotion marketing

7,292 notes

The truth is, everyone likes to look down on someone. If your favorites are all avant-garde writers who throw in Sanskrit and German, you can look down on everyone. If your favorites are all Oprah Book Club books, you can at least look down on mystery readers. Mystery readers have sci-fi readers. Sci-fi can look down on fantasy. And yes, fantasy readers have their own snobbishness. I’ll bet this, though: in a hundred years, people will be writing a lot more dissertations on Harry Potter than on John Updike. Look, Charles Dickens wrote popular fiction. Shakespeare wrote popular fiction - until he wrote his sonnets, desperate to show the literati of his day that he was real artist. Edgar Allan Poe tied himself in knots because no one realized he was a genius. The core of the problem is how we want to define “literature”. The Latin root simply means “letters”. Those letters are either delivered - they connect with an audience - or they don’t. For some, that audience is a few thousand college professors and some critics. For others, its twenty million women desperate for romance in their lives. Those connections happen because the books successfully communicate something real about the human experience. Sure, there are trashy books that do really well, but that’s because there are trashy facets of humanity. What people value in their books - and thus what they count as literature - really tells you more about them than it does about the book.
Brent Weeks (via victoriousvocabulary)

(via clevergirlhelps)

Filed under literature writers readers quotes

763 notes

Everybody has a secret world inside of them. I mean everybody. All of the people in the whole world, I mean everybody— no matter how dull and boring they are on the outside. Inside them they’ve all got unimaginable, magnificent, wonderful, stupid, amazing worlds… Not just one world. Hundreds of them. Thousands, maybe.
Neil Gaiman (via maxkirin)

Filed under neil gaiman writerly quotes imagination

88,481 notes

tamorapierce:

owlmylove:

when i find stretch marks on my thighs i make a point of smooching them because they’re just doing their best at keeping the all-powerful immortal Being within me from ripping my mortal shell asunder in a blaze of heavenly glory and eviscerating the cosmos in my divine wrath

You know what?  You just changed an aspect of myself I’ve hated since ballet class in sixth grade.  Thank you!

Filed under positivity

209,305 notes

rainamermaid:

memewhore:

sean3116:

sixpenceee:

As someone who wants to study the human consciousness I found this very interesting.

Scott Routley was a “vegetable”. A car accident seriously injured both sides of his brain, and for 12 years, he was completely unresponsive.

Unable to speak or track people with his eyes, it seemed that Routley was unaware of his surroundings, and doctors assumed he was lost in limbo. They were wrong.

In 2012, Professor Adrian Owen decided to run tests on comatose patients like Scott Routley. Curious if some “vegetables” were actually conscious, Owen put Routley in an fMRI and told him to imagine walking through his home. Suddenly, the brain scan showed activity. Routley not only heard Owen, he was responding.

Next, the two worked out a code. Owen asked a series of “yes or no” questions, and if the answer was “yes,” Routley thought about walking around his house. If the answer was “no,” Routley thought about playing tennis.

These different actions showed activity different parts of the brain. Owen started off with easy questions like, “Is the sky blue?” However, they changed medical science when Owen asked, “Are you in pain?” and Routley answered, “No.” It was the first time a comatose patient with serious brain damage had let doctors know about his condition.

While Scott Routley is still trapped in his body, he finally has a way to reach out to the people around him. This finding has huge implications.

SOURCE

HOLY STEAMING SHITFUCKS

WHY IS EVERYONE NOT LOSING THEIR SHIT ABOUT THIS

What a fucking nightmare, just kill me.

I know a girl who was hit by a drunk driver and in that state for a year. When she woke up the first thing she did was tell off the doctor who tried to convince her mom to pull the plug. She heard *everything* while being called brain dead.

(via clevergirlhelps)

Filed under coma

165 notes

Anonymous asked: I ACIDENTALY DELETED THE WHOLE BEGINNING OF MY STORY, IT WASN'T MUCH YET, BUT I'M TERRIBLE AT REWRITING THINGS

thewritingcafe:

My laptop has a terrible internal battery and whenever the charger is unplugged, it dies anywhere from five to twenty-five minutes. About a week ago, there was a spider nearby. I hate spiders. I hate bugs in general. This spider was a big white one that I had seen a few times before, but was never able to kill because it was too fast. So I left my laptop and spent half an hour waiting for this spider to show itself again so I could kill it.

While I was waiting with a broom in one hand and a shoe in the other, the charger came unplugged from my computer and it died. And I lost 5k words from my Camp NaNoWriMo novel, which I hadn’t planned out at all since I decided to just wing it.

After getting over my desperation and frustration, I was kind of grateful that had happened because:

  1. I was going to have to rewrite it anyway, and so will you.
  2. First drafts are terrible. No one but me was ever going to see that part anyway.
  3. I started reevaluating my story and where it was going. Now I have a fuller plot with a better idea of what’s going on.
  4. Losing your work is a terrible thing, but it’s kind of an unlucky and unwanted right of passage for writers.
  5. Rewriting from memory is an exercise that tests just how much you know about your story.
  6. You know your characters, settings, and plots better the second time you write them, even if you have a full outline.

If you’re at that point where you don’t want to redo the beginning because you just got past it and it’s tiring to do it all over again, start writing where you left off and go back to the beginning later.

Filed under losing your work writing

444,181 notes

apromptripost:

mermaidsbite:

huffingtonpost:

People have offered many potential explanations for this discrepancy, but this ad highlights the importance of the social cues that push girls away from math and science in their earliest childhood years.

Watch the powerful Verizon advertisement to really understand what a little girl hears when you tell her she’s pretty.

I was fortunate, this didn’t happen to me… until I was a STEM major in college :/

Submitting this as #promptadvice because how we frame our words MATTERS. Examine the assumptions you put into your writing. All of ‘em.

(Source: youtube.com)

Filed under writing advice stem girls like science

83,709 notes

I read several dozen stories a year from miserable, lonely guys who insist that women won’t come near them despite the fact that they are just the nicest guys in the world.

..I’m asking what do you offer? Are you smart? Funny? Interesting? Talented? Ambitious? Creative? OK, now what do you do to demonstrate those attributes to the world? Don’t say that you’re a nice guy — that’s the bare minimum.

“Well, I’m not sexist or racist or greedy or shallow or abusive! Not like those other douchebags!”

I’m sorry, I know that this is hard to hear, but if all you can do is list a bunch of faults you don’t have, then back the fuck away..

..Don’t complain about how girls fall for jerks; they fall for those jerks because those jerks have other things they can offer. “But I’m a great listener!” Are you? Because you’re willing to sit quietly in exchange for the chance to be in the proximity of a pretty girl (and spend every second imagining how soft her skin must be)? Well guess what, there’s another guy in her life who also knows how to do that, and he can play the guitar. Saying that you’re a nice guy is like a restaurant whose only selling point is that the food doesn’t make you sick. You’re like a new movie whose title is This Movie Is in English, and its tagline is “The actors are clearly visible”.

David Wong, 6 Harsh Truths That Will Make You a Better Person  (via coolgrandpa)

(Source: violetmaps, via ehnlee)

Filed under david wong